Seek & Destroy

Seek and Destroy

Dave Thomas San Diego Performance360Written by Dave Thomas
Owner, Performance360

You either do something with purpose, or you do not.

There is no grey.

The side of the fence in which you sit makes all the difference towards whether the outcome blows the doors off the fucking hinges or is simply enough to get by.

My homeboy Robby is putting together a Samurai post on mentally executing lifts for the gym site, so I won’t step on his toes, but one aspect of life and lifting I want to briefly touch on, and really the determining factor towards whether or not you succeed is the ability to apply purpose to what you are doing.

Do you reluctantly crawl out of bed?  Or do you have awake with a sense of purpose for the day?

Do you amble along?

Or do you seek and destroy?

Certainly in the gym, whether or not you approach a heavy lift with focus, purpose and intent makes the difference in whether or not you complete a repetition.

Pull under with fortitude and you’ll succeed.

Stroll under with reluctance and it will crush you.

Observe P360 member Noah Cosby unracking weight for a set of three.  Call it psyching one’s self up, harnessing energy, whatever.  It’s not yelling and screaming.  It’s a quick moment of internal focus.  Once the decision is made to get under the bar its done with ferocity that rattles the plates and like he is going to eat the barbell’s children.

While it’s just a split of second of gathering your mental game, the difference between purpose and casually walking under the barbell is profound and visually contrasting.

It’s no secret that I firmly believe one’s behavior in the gym is indicative of one’s behavior in life.  I am yet to see a successful and committed person in the gym lack success outside of it,  and vice versa.

I’m not talking about money, I am talking about kicking ass at living life.

Purpose in the gym begets purpose outside of it.

Bank it.

Sometimes the ability to be purposeful is inherent.  Most of the time it is learned, and if you lack it, acquiring the skill of purpose is quite easy.

First, you have to find out what truly motivates you.  Maybe it’s to compete as an athlete.  Maybe it’s to look better naked.  Maybe it’s to perform well and be strong.  Maybe it’s to sidestep that hereditary heart disease that runs in your family.

That’s the easy part.

Now, take that answer and apply it further intrinsically.  Go deeper. WHY do you want to compete as an athlete?  WHY do you want to look better naked?  WHY do you want to be perform well and be strong?  WHY do you want to deadlift four hundred pounds?

Why?

Answering that is not easy. Sometimes you’ll find your goals are not really your goals after all, and sometimes it might take you a place you didn’t want to go.  Maybe a dark place.  Maybe a place of enlightenment.  But getting there reveals your “why” and once it is uncovered, it’s the single beacon that should guide you along the shoreline.

A committed life in the gym creates a committed life outside of it.  Once discovered, hogtied and controlled, it’s like Luke first learning about The Force from Obi-Wan.

You’ll add more dimensions to your life without any awareness to your actions at all.

You will find yourself taking on more challenges.  Getting outside the cube of your life.  Taking trips.  Experiencing your surroundings you didn’t know existed.  Going to see live music.  Eating delicious food.  Getting off the grid every now and then.  Doing that thing you’ve always wanted to do.  Being daring.  Approaching that girl.  Asking for that promotion.  Making that career change.  Following your passion.

Purpose don’t die, it multiplies.

Let purpose in the gym act as the flint that sparks greater change and improvement in your life.  The stuff that really matters.

Be more than one dimension, and be so with vigor.

It all starts with a little sense of purpose.

Agree? Disagree? Let me know what you think, and if you liked it, please hit the SHARE button below.

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